Rachel O’Brien

Halifax, Nova Scotia
Bachelor of Arts
Class of 2020

I read To the Lighthouse as a text that illuminates the eternal and unifying capacity of art as a kind of love that allows for the forging of meaningful connections among people. I find this especially moving as someone who is pursuing an arts degree, because it reminds me of the greater implications of what I am studying.”

Why did you choose King’s?

I chose to come to King’s because I loved the sound of the Foundation Year Program.  I was very excited by the prospect of spending a year reading some of the most important and influential texts of the Western Canon within the intimate, community minded pedagogical structure of FYP.

What book or text that you’ve read at King’s has made the biggest impression on you?

While it is almost impossible to isolate the single text I’ve read during my time at King’s that has made the greatest impression on me, the first that comes to mind is always Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse.  This novel resonates with me as a humanities student because of Woolf’s beautiful portrayal of the profound connection between love and art.  I read To the Lighthouse as a text that illuminates the eternal and unifying capacity of art as a kind of love that allows for the forging of meaningful connections among people.  I find this especially moving as someone who is pursuing an arts degree, because it reminds me of the greater implications of what I am studying.

How has King’s changed you as a person?

King’s has given me the tools and confidence to articulate my thoughts and ideas, as well as how to better understand and listen to the thoughts and ideas of others.  My time at King’s has taught me not only how to be a better reader, but how to be a better member of a community. This is a real gift.